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Mark S

Sandy B Step1 – Recovered – Recovered 1342

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Sandy B. from Washington, DC speaking on the topic of the 1st step at the Saturday Morning Live Group in Washington, DC – January 1st 1994

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Service Work and Giving Back – Recovered 1341

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Service work and giving back play a crucial role in the recovery process from drug and alcohol addiction. Engaging in service work allows individuals to shift their focus from themselves to helping others, fostering a sense of purpose, connection, and fulfillment. By giving back, individuals in recovery develop a sense of responsibility and accountability, recognizing the impact of their actions on the broader community. This shift from self-centeredness to selflessness is a transformative experience that aids in personal growth and strengthens one’s commitment to long-term sobriety.

Tonight, we talk about service work and giving back.

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Rebekah, Jinifer, Bryan, Dana, Tonja, Kendy, Karen, Tony, Sam, Chris, Chance

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Hope and Optimism – Recovered 1339

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Hope and optimism in a recovery program not only benefit you on a personal level but also strengthen the overall recovery community. When you share stories of hope and demonstrate optimism, you inspire others struggling with addiction. The power of hope is contagious, igniting a sense of belief and determination in those who may have lost sight of their own potential. Additionally, a positive and hopeful atmosphere within the recovery community fosters support, encouragement, and a sense of belonging, all of which are crucial for long-term recovery success.

Tonight, we talk about Finding Hope and Optimism

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Joel, Martin, Teresa, Becky, Kim, Shelly, Amanda, Kurt, Peter, Gigi, Teresaty, Jim, Schez, Jim, Vicki, Audrey, Cristie, Falisha, Nicole

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A New Pair of Glasses Chuck C Part 6 – Recovered 1340

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Chuck C. from Laguna Beach, CA doing his workshop “A New Pair of Glasses” at the Pala Mesa Retreat – January 1975

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13th Stepping Not Allowed

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Thirteenth stepping refers to the inappropriate behavior of more experienced members in a 12-step community targeting and engaging in romantic or sexual relationships with newcomers or individuals who are less experienced in their recovery journey. This behavior is harmful and damaging to the community for several reasons.

First and foremost, 13th stepping takes advantage of vulnerable individuals who are seeking help and support in their recovery. Newcomers are often emotionally fragile and looking for guidance from experienced members. Engaging in inappropriate relationships with them can lead to manipulation and exploitation, hindering their progress and potentially causing them to relapse or abandon their recovery altogether.

Secondly, it undermines the very purpose of the 12-step community, which is to provide a safe and supportive environment for individuals to work through their addiction and achieve sobriety. By engaging in 13th stepping, some members disrupt the trust and sense of community that is essential for recovery. It creates an atmosphere of mistrust and fear, making it challenging for individuals to open up honestly about their struggles and seek help.

Moreover, 13th stepping perpetuates a power imbalance within the community. Experienced members may use their position to exert control over newcomers, leading to emotional manipulation and coercion. This unequal power dynamic not only harms the individuals involved in these relationships but also weakens the overall integrity of the community.

To address and prevent 13th stepping, the fellowship must take several measures. Firstly, community leaders and organizers should prioritize education and awareness about the issue. Workshops and discussions can be organized to help members understand the negative impact of 13th stepping and the importance of maintaining healthy boundaries and respect for one another.

Secondly, implementing a code of conduct that explicitly prohibits 13th stepping can help establish clear boundaries for members. This code of conduct should outline appropriate behavior and the consequences for violating these rules.

Thirdly, promoting a culture of accountability is vital. Encouraging members to look out for one another and report to appropriate authorities any instances of 13th stepping will help ensure that such behavior does not go unnoticed or unchecked.

Additionally, establishing mentorship programs with clear guidelines can be beneficial. These programs can pair newcomers with experienced, supportive mentors who are committed to helping them in their recovery journey without any ulterior motives.

Overall, 13th stepping is a serious issue that undermines the purpose and integrity of 12-step communities. By fostering a culture of respect, education, and accountability, the fellowship can create a safe and supportive environment for everyone seeking recovery, thereby preventing the harmful effects of 13th stepping and promoting the overall well-being of its members.

A New Pair of Glasses Chuck C Part 5 – Recovered 1338

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Chuck C. from Laguna Beach, CA doing his workshop “A New Pair of Glasses” at the Pala Mesa Retreat – January 1975

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A New Pair of Glasses Chuck C Part 4 – Recovered 1337

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Chuck C. from Laguna Beach, CA doing his workshop “A New Pair of Glasses” at the Pala Mesa Retreat – January 1975

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We Are Taking a Break

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Friends!

We hope this email finds you well.

We wanted to inform you that there won’t be any new episodes of the Recovered Podcast available over the next two weeks. However, we have prepared something special for you during this period. We will be featuring famous talks from two remarkable individuals who have made a significant impact in the recovery community: Chuck C and Sandy B. Their insightful and inspirational messages are sure to provide you with valuable insights and an enriching experience.

While we work behind the scenes to prepare fresh episodes, we encourage you to take this opportunity to revisit these timeless talks and immerse yourself in the wisdom they impart. We believe they will bring you joy, comfort, and renewed motivation on your personal journey of recovery.

Peace,
Mark and Anna

Ruth Hock

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Ruth H0ck, an exceptional secretary, played a pivotal role in the creation and success of the book “Alcoholics Anonymous.” Her dedication, skill, and unwavering commitment to the project made her an integral part of its development. As the secretary who typed the manuscript, Ruth worked closely with the authors, Bill Wilson and Hank Parkhurst, providing invaluable support and contributing to the book’s profound impact on countless lives.

Ruth Hock’s meticulous attention to detail and strong organizational skills were crucial in the process of typing the manuscript for “Alcoholics Anonymous.” With utmost care, she transcribed the authors’ handwritten notes and drafts, ensuring the clarity and accuracy of the final text. Ruth’s ability to adapt to the authors’ unique writing styles and capture their voices in the typed pages was a testament to her talent as a secretary.

Beyond her exceptional typing abilities, Ruth Hock also demonstrated a deep understanding of the message and purpose of “Alcoholics Anonymous.” She recognized the importance of the book as a tool for individuals struggling with alcohol addiction to find hope and support. Ruth’s passion for the project drove her to work long hours, often sacrificing personal time, to meet the demanding deadlines and contribute to the book’s timely publication.

Ruth’s commitment to the principles of anonymity, a core value of “Alcoholics Anonymous,” was commendable. She fully respected the confidential nature of the authors’ work and kept their identities anonymous throughout the process. Ruth understood the significance of maintaining privacy for those sharing their personal stories in the book, and her unwavering dedication to this principle ensured the integrity and trustworthiness of the publication.

Ruth Hock’s contribution to “Alcoholics Anonymous” extended beyond her role as a secretary. She became an advocate for the program and its philosophy, actively promoting its principles and supporting individuals seeking help for alcohol addiction. Her involvement in the early stages of the book’s development allowed her to witness firsthand the transformative impact of the program, further inspiring her commitment to spreading its message of hope and recovery.

In conclusion, Ruth Hock’s role as the secretary who typed the book “Alcoholics Anonymous” was instrumental in its creation and dissemination. Her exceptional typing skills, unwavering commitment, and understanding of the program’s principles made her an invaluable asset to the authors and the wider recovery community. Ruth’s dedication to maintaining anonymity and her passion for helping others contributed to the success and enduring legacy of “Alcoholics Anonymous.” Her story serves as a testament to the profound impact that individuals behind the scenes can have on transformative projects that touch the lives of many.

A New Pair of Glasses Chuck C Part 3 – Recovered 1336

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Chuck C. from Laguna Beach, CA doing his workshop “A New Pair of Glasses” at the Pala Mesa Retreat – January 1975

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