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The Negative Promises – Recovered 837

150 150 Mark S

This episode is sponsored by The Recovered Podcast Reception and Live Shows
At the 2017 Tri-County Conference atthe Wyndham Garden Hotel in Sterling Heights, Michigan.

On Friday, September 29th at 5:45 pm, the Recovered Podcast will be leading a panel discussion on “Recovery and the Digital Age.”  We want to you to be part of the show and add to the discussion.

Just go to http://recoveredcast.com/tricounty for more information

Our cost to participate in this event is about $2000,
And we could use your help

To support us as we spread this message of hope to the new guy
Go over to http://recoveredcast.com/donation

Alcoholics and Addicts in recovery are told to
“Play the tape all the way through”
when they are thinking about drinking or using.
What does that mean? Well, it’s really quite simple.

When we start to think about drinking,
sometimes we have a tendency to
romanticize the drinking.
I
We think only the good stuff
In other words, we think about the immediate effects.

What we don’t think about, are the negative promises,
Those things that are sure to happen to me if I start drinking again.

We don’t think about the consequences,
the hangovers,
the pain we’d cause others,
the disappointment,
the shame,
the sickness of the withdrawals.

These are my negative promises.
Playing the tape through helps me to see the reality of me drinking again.

What came first to mind when you heard about the topic,
The Negative Promises?

What does the expression “The Negative Promises” mean to you?
What does “play the tape through” mean to you?
Do you ever romanticize drinking?
What good things do you remember?
How real are these thoughts?
When do you have these thoughts?
Are these thoughts dangerous?
Why or why not?
How do you feel when you have these thoughts?

What are some of the consequences that would happen to you if you started to drink again, what are the negative promises in you life?
When you play the tape through, does it help?
Why or why not?

How do you cope?
What steps, prayers, what tools do you use to combat these thoughts?

WE HAVE CALLS

Kevin from LA
https://www.google.com/voice/fm/00557165274674955804/AHwOX_CLj6IGg0mr7yJ4-exabeDOHSqgEyx4oBpxSn0c27EdpOaHeua68T2WesBcrRN_D0tzxNn2AeRSlHcQ5t9ifxfOUJ3j6bZApHdFn-mvJ3STUi4t3tK7Gmyhk0DzcJI02PiWPeVcX_pgK2cdm9uEz7Cz5LM1HA

Don from Boiled Owl
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Kevin on donations
https://www.google.com/voice/fm/00557165274674955804/AHwOX_DMV6I7gNBKkVBWWpJnUk1usYDs2XkrlSonMIkT81ze9BAaVrnEe-tIFU7TdubFvdKW4BdSX2dCYIOsts7hEIL7nPU8YRDzgCCqdZVKXikE68PGFoIuw072ytjzlD8j585A8GUQYAwaNaMfGOpJQGNah_BEaw
Alex from Austin
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Check out this episode!

Jay Bill and Matt Part 5 – Recovered 836

150 150 Mark S

Our generous Recovered Podcast Community allows us to be self supporting and not rely on outside contributions.  If you would like to join us, there are two ways.

  1. Episode Sponsorship  We will recognize you by first name only at the top, mid, and end of the episode.  Any amount will qualify.
  2. Premium Membership  This is the single most effective way to support the show.  Watch the video in its entirety and learn how to become Premium

The Recovered Podcast Community is not a glum lot.  They contribute to the show and what they share is exactly what someone else needs to hear.  The new guy needs to hear your story.  So honor your 12th step obligation by calling in and help the guy who has not yet gone to his first meeting, you may make the difference in his life.  There are two ways to add to the show:

  1. Speakpipe Use your mobile or computer and leave a message.  This is the preferred method because the sound quality is excellent.
  2. 1-734-288-7510 is our voice message line.

Check out this episode!

Controlled Drinking – Recovered 835

150 150 Mark S

This episode is sponsored by The Recovered Podcast Reception and Live Shows
At the 2017 Tri-County Conference atthe Wyndham Garden Hotel in Sterling Heights, Michigan.

On Friday, September 29th at 5:45 pm, the Recovered Podcast will be leading a panel discussion on “Recovery and the Digital Age.”  We want to you to be part of the show and add to the discussion.

Just go to http://recoveredcast.com/tricounty for more information

Our cost to participate in this event is about $2000,
And we could use your help

To support us as we spread this message of hope to the new guy
Go over to http://recoveredcast.com/donation

“Despite all we can say, many who are real alcoholics are not going to believe they are in that class. By every form of self-deception and experimentation, they will try to prove themselves exceptions to the rule, therefore nonalcoholic. If anyone who is showing inability to control his drinking can do the right- about-face and drink like a gentleman, our hats are off to him. Heaven knows, we have tried hard enough and long enough to drink like other people!

Here are some of the methods we have tried: Drinking beer only, limiting the number of drinks, never drinking alone, never drinking in the morning, drinking only at home, never having it in the house, never drinking during business hours, drinking only at parties, switching from scotch to brandy, drinking only natural wines, agreeing to resign if ever drunk on the job, taking a trip, not taking a trip, swearing off forever (with and without a solemn oath), taking more physical exercise, reading inspirational books, going to health farms and sanitariums, accepting voluntary commitment to asylums – we could increase the list ad infinitum.

We do not like to pronounce any individual as alcoholic, but you can quickly diagnose yourself. Step over to the nearest barroom and try some controlled drinking. Try to drink and stop abruptly. Try it more than once. It will not take long for you to decide, if you are honest with yourself about it. It may be worth a bad case of jitters if you get a full knowledge of your condition.”

What is controlled drinking?
Have you ever tried controlled drinking?
Do you think you ever had the ability to control your drinking?

What are the different classes of problem drinkers described in the book?
Moderate drinkers have little trouble in giving up liquor entirely if they have good reason for it. They can take it or leave it alone.
certain type of hard drinker. He may have the habit badly enough to gradually impair him physically and mentally. this man can also stop or moderate, although he may find it difficult and troublesome
The type that begins to lose all control of his liquor consumption, once he starts to drink. one symptom: they cannot start drinking without developing the phenomenon of craving.

What class is the book intended for?
Why do you think the book suggests to try some controlled drinking

If you can control your drinking, is AA for you?
What is the only requirement for membership?
Is there a disconnect here?

Have you ever recommended someone control their drinking?
What were the results?

If you could drink safely now, would you?

WE HAVE CALLS

Kevin from LA
https://www.google.com/voice/fm/00557165274674955804/AHwOX_Bh-iQ6TSLtwESuicZVJwWaXxc1dDh5Vks9Pz2PuRlJHPpBBMrn9ku3AmiunlbQIeNmXlmW-PntyvVsz3_WmPsxCMtCrL8LBU8z-ELnCTZV7jkOgzSKtRGuPjjUK5fljgzLttkFyQD6kQN1-xc2DZMnaePc9w

Mike from Celebration Florida
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Justin
https://www.speakpipe.com/recoveredcast

Jason
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Don with Boiled Owl Podcast
https://www.google.com/voice/fm/00557165274674955804/AHwOX_CSiEMRAHGf2ZInWe8M93C9Zs1rVTZFmZl4pGzWlt1kYeM5rH3PC95in1Rrb-yGlAHMJXclViCSlqbOwC3vDyydJkT0E-eNDbkyjrbfZKKhN8N-BN2oFx2Bkbe0u4nerdsQFibTf65lYWW_QkwhslRKNIiYIg

Check out this episode!

Two sides of the Good Time Charlie By Annie Highwater

150 150 Mark S

Good Time Charlies, Codependency and Shame; a Conversation with Award Winning Journalist Rob Koebel

Award winning Journalist, writer, actor and producer Rob Koebel has been one of my most lighthearted, fun and interesting conversations since I began writing work in the Recovery realm.

Rob has quite an inspiring story, as much as he has led an interesting life (bio below).

After experiencing a very public downward spiral, Rob has been making a climb upward and onward, helping others to see what is behind the face of the “Good Time Charlie” drinkers.   He gives sharp insight for those who know and love (or might be) someone known as the life of the party.

One thing you catch quickly is Rob’s ease in conversation, which puts others at ease themselves.  It did not surprise me that our conversation led to the pitfalls of being likeable when it comes to drugs and alcohol misuse.

Rob opened with a very honest stroll through his early years, from common middle school insecurities, wanting to blend in, win over the girls and “be the fun.”  Like many of us, he joined in on underage social drinking to feel confident and included.  Yet for some that becomes more of a pattern than for others.

Rob’s journey led him through high school and college antics that were overlooked due to the “boys will be boys” attitude of those in authority who gave him somewhat of a pass.   He went onto become a television news reporter/anchor, taking his drinking habit, which didn’t appear to be a problem, with him.

There were however, warning signs and red flags along the way that drinking was becoming a go to friend for Rob.  Spending late nights blowing off steam at the bar had developed into a coping skill, impacting his relationships with his wife and family.

Good Time Charlie drinkers are usually different when the lights go down.  After the last call for alcohol, they have to go home and wake up to reality. Many times there is someone who has been home waiting, feeling the pain from the other side of the night.

Those who love a charmer know the pain of life alongside them and that the reality at home is different once the party ends. Likeable alcoholics may not look like they’re in trouble or their lives are being affected, because the truth behind the scenes doesn’t rise to meet the eye.

It can be easier to excuse substance abusive behavior if it seems funny, wild and crazy.  Or when the one in question is friendly, fun and easy to like.  Yet eventually it catches up in relationships, if not other areas of life.

“It’s very hard to have relationships when you’re doing drugs and drinking, I find, for me personally…you become closed off, unreceptive, insensitive” ~David Bowie

***

As much fun as an excessive drinking lifestyle can initially be, I posed a question to several folks who also opted out of the binge drinking cycle:

“What did it eventually lead to?”

Their answers were extremely realistic:

Alcohol abuse led to: relationships we couldn’t see the truth about, a marriage that fell apart.  Friendships that were surface only and sometimes very toxic. A drunk driving charge. Arguments.  Conflicts. Hangovers.  Job loss or attendance issues.  Harder drugs.  Embarrassment.  Health issues. Weight gain.  Lack of goals outside of the next social gathering. And so on.

The truth is, eventually habitual and excessive alcohol use catches up.  Even if you are the life of the party, eventually the party ends and someone gets hurt.  The party tends to destroy a family.

The habitual lifestyle of excessive drinking caught up to Rob with a tidal wave of consequences, as it does for most.  After a series of events; a divorce, a tell all book and country song written about his marriage, drama within the workplace etc., Rob had an embarrassing encounter with an Apple Store that served as his wakeup call.

Harsh consequences may not be the outcome for every person who engages in a lifestyle of frequent drinking, but one or more of the above has certainly occurred for most. Alcoholism is as damaging, deadly and dangerous as drug abuse.

While drug abuse is viewed as shameful, criminal and deadly, excessive drinking is just as dangerous yet is still largely viewed (and advertised) as socially acceptable.

But what is excessive drinking? There are two types:

  • Heavy drinking – For men under age 65, heavy drinking means having four drinks a day or more than 14 drinks in a week. For women and men over age 65, heavy drinking is more than three drinks a day or more than seven drinks in a week.
  • Binge drinking – Binge drinking is drinking a large amount of alcohol at one time. For men, it’s defined as five or more drinks within two hours. For women, it’s four or more drinks in that same time frame.

Signs of alcohol abuse and alcoholism

Heavy drinking or binge drinking once in a blue moon might not be a problem for you. But some behaviors are indicators that things are getting serious. Signs to look out for include:

Neglecting responsibilities

This might look like low performance at work or in school, not paying attention to your kids, or skipping commitments because you’re drunk or hung over.

Taking risks and encountering legal problems

Driving while intoxicated, mixing alcohol with medication, and putting your life and others’ lives in danger is a sign that something is seriously wrong.

Drinking to de-stress

American culture makes it seem normal to drink after a long workday or after an argument with a loved one. But this can turn alcohol into a need.

Drinking in spite of relationship problems

If you find yourself drinking even though you know it upsets your spouse, or if you find yourself fighting with family who criticize your drinking habits, there may be a bigger problem at hand.

***

Alcohol related divorce rates and statistics don’t lie.  An estimated 88,000 people (approximately 62,000 men and 26,000 women) die from alcohol-related causes annually, making alcohol the fourth leading preventable cause of death in the United States. In 2014, alcohol-impaired driving fatalities accounted for 9,967 deaths (31 percent of overall driving fatalities).

***

“Codependency is driven by the agreement that I will work harder on your problems and your life than you do. This is not love.” ~Danny Silk

The flip side of this issue is the family and loved ones at home. Many are deeply affected and codependent to alcoholic behavior issues. Yet as painful and often unfair as the cycle becomes, affected Loved Ones also play a part.  Just because the one with the substance related behavior is presenting the loudest, doesn’t mean those close to them are healthy and well.  Or right.

If not managed, everyone around the issue becomes deadlocked in arguments and patterns.

In times of crisis with a Loved One who is actively in use, significant others (along with by standing friends and family) get looped into bottomless, tug of war arguments;

“Why can’t you just stop!”

“Why can’t you understand?”

Back and forth, push and pull.  New issue, same argument, stuck on repeat.

We become fearful, nagging, self-righteous and unglued.  

They become insensitive, inconsiderate and hurtful.  And eventually deceptive and brash.

We often think “F*** this!”

They often think “F*** it.”

We hear with our fears, they speak with their frustration. 

We lash out of pain, they react with shame. 

Funny how we all have our survival techniques when in crisis. Each becomes dead locked in their position and the back and forth ensues, neither able to breakthrough or hear, much less understand the other.  Fear, pain and shame are terrible communicators. Life seems to unravel and relationships are damaged.

It’s a sickening cycle.  Someone drinks (or gets high), someone shames, no one copes.

I personally come from a background of religious dysfunction and condemnation (detailed in my book Unhooked).  Shaming was a constant in my life for many years.   Along with having been through the rollercoaster of prescription drug dependency with very close family members, I have been on both the giver and the taker sides of shame.

I know this to be fact; shaming someone into anything, let alone sobriety, does not workIt doesn’t even help.

Questions posed to anyone whose life has been affected by someone’s drinking or substance abuse is “Does shaming them work? Did the person get better?  Has life improved?”

We have to stop and ask, does it work?  The answer is no, it does not work.  It doesn’t even help.

There is a world of difference between shame and accountability.

Accountability and consequences alongside a healthy, loving plan to manage the issues (such as professional direction from a family substance abuse counselor, Al Anon support groups and literature and the CRAFT method) are profoundly better, much more effective methods.

I also strongly encourage research.  There is a mountain of knowledge to discover when it comes to the disease of dependency. The more you read, search online, attend a class or support meeting, search your local library or bookstores for literature or meet with a professional specializing in family dynamics of dependency; the better chance you have of working through the madness, confusion and pain of it.  And possibly restoring peace to relationships that are worn down.

There’s a need for all involved with someone struggling with drugs or alcohol issues to become educated on facts and positive methods of coping and contributing.

We all have a perspective and play a role in the family when it comes to SUD.  The more willing we are to understand the struggle in the mind of one who is dependent (and vice versa), the better.

Alcoholism and addiction are family illnesses, we all play a part. The healthier family and friends become, the more chance there is to move our impacted relationships forward toward healing and wellness with our struggling Loved One.

But first, let’s drop the shame. Shaming is part of the cycle of sickness.  We need to realize it’s also a toxic part of the problem. When we learn and work together, people recover, relationships mend and families heal. Knowledge is power.  Safe, honest communication leads to peace.

Recovery works!

There’s always hope, but we all have work to do to get there.

Thank you Rob, for being open, honest, likeable and for doing the work to inspire others to make a comeback,

Annie 

(Recovering Codependent)

***

These days Rob Koebel can be found writing, acting and producing documentaries including Story Junkie and Chasing Evel; Official Selection of the Nashville Film Festival and Big Sky Film Festival, based on the life and career of Evel Knievel’s son Robbie Knievel who was the most celebrated daredevil in the 80s and 90s.

Rob Koebel is an award-winning journalist, actor, writer, host and voice over artist. His journalism work has earned him Emmy’s, Associated Press and an Edward R Murrow award. His career as a journalist spans nearly two decades. Rob covered Presidential elections from the campaign trail; tracked one of the FBI’s most-wanted killers in a huge manhunt through rural Arizona; exposed corruption in the government at state, local and federal levels; and busted a nationwide sports memorabilia company selling fake autographs in stadium team shops across the country.

***

Book link for: Unhooked

For Support, information and comfort:

Allies in Recovery

Al Anon

Nar Anon 

AA

NA

Jay Bill and Matt Part 4 – Recovered 834

150 150 Mark S

Our generous Recovered Podcast Community allows us to be self supporting and not rely on outside contributions.  If you would like to join us, there are two ways.

  1. Episode Sponsorship  We will recognize you by first name only at the top, mid, and end of the episode.  Any amount will qualify.
  2. Premium Membership  This is the single most effective way to support the show.  Watch the video in its entirety and learn how to become Premium

The Recovered Podcast Community is not a glum lot.  They contribute to the show and what they share is exactly what someone else needs to hear.  The new guy needs to hear your story.  So honor your 12th step obligation by calling in and help the guy who has not yet gone to his first meeting, you may make the difference in his life.  There are two ways to add to the show:

  1. Speakpipe Use your mobile or computer and leave a message.  This is the preferred method because the sound quality is excellent.
  2. 1-734-288-7510 is our voice message line.

Check out this episode!

Jay Bill and Matt Part 2 – Recovered 832

150 150 Mark S

Our generous Recovered Podcast Community allows us to be self supporting and not rely on outside contributions.  If you would like to join us, there are two ways.

  1. Episode Sponsorship  We will recognize you by first name only at the top, mid, and end of the episode.  Any amount will qualify.
  2. Premium Membership  This is the single most effective way to support the show.  Watch the video in its entirety and learn how to become Premium

The Recovered Podcast Community is not a glum lot.  They contribute to the show and what they share is exactly what someone else needs to hear.  The new guy needs to hear your story.  So honor your 12th step obligation by calling in and help the guy who has not yet gone to his first meeting, you may make the difference in his life.  There are two ways to add to the show:

  1. Speakpipe Use your mobile or computer and leave a message.  This is the preferred method because the sound quality is excellent.
  2. 1-734-288-7510 is our voice message line.

Check out this episode!

Mocktails and Other Non-alcoholic Drinks – Recovered 832

150 150 Mark S

Our generous Recovered Podcast Community allows us to be self supporting and not rely on outside contributions.  If you would like to join us, there are two ways.

  1. Episode Sponsorship  We will recognize you by first name only at the top, mid, and end of the episode.  Any amount will qualify.
  2. Premium Membership  This is the single most effective way to support the show.  Watch the video in its entirety and learn how to become Premium

The Recovered Podcast Community is not a glum lot.  They contribute to the show and what they share is exactly what someone else needs to hear.  The new guy needs to hear your story.  So honor your 12th step obligation by calling in and help the guy who has not yet gone to his first meeting, you may make the difference in his life.  There are two ways to add to the show:

  1. Speakpipe Use your mobile or computer and leave a message.  This is the preferred method because the sound quality is excellent.
  2. 1-734-288-7510 is our voice message line.

Summer is almost here, which means warmer weather, longer days and the season of BBQs, pool parties and dining al fresco. If you’re a recovering alcoholic, it can also mean the added stress of sweating out social events where frosty margaritas, colorful pitchers of sangria, tubs of ice-cold beer and other alcoholic beverages are center stage. “For an alcoholic, life is a temptation to drink,”. “But the summer setting may bring on more of a temptation than winter, simply because there are more outdoor parties in the heat, begging for a cool drink.”

But there may be a way to navigate this tempting season.

Quoting the article:
Mocktail drinks can, for some, be a slippery slope into using again. “For some people, continuing to act as though you’re having a drink can lead to the eventual addition of a ‘little’ alcohol and then more, leading to relapse,”

Thoughts on giving up the using life style/culture?

Quoting the article
Whether it’s the clink of ice cubes, the weight or shape of the glass or the look and smell of a beverage, “any cues associated with your favorite drink are going to elicit all kinds of changes in the brain that initially mimic the changes that elicit cravings in the first place,”
Your thoughts on knowing your triggers?

Quote:
research has shown that sugar can become as addictive as cocaine or morphine, she adds, noting a PLOS One study. “This is especially true of alcoholics and people who are addicted to stimulants,”
Thoughts?

What do you drink for fun?
What are your recipes?
Most unusual?
What do you avoid?

WE HAVE CALLS

…from Ohio
https://www.google.com/voice/fm/00557165274674955804/AHwOX_AtYOF2jYwXOa0xTCOrHvHAP8ym2KudKHBfed1imV5mmA47wRvrkyGGquNUweq47H3ZwtBd0aFNXnH75qnccVesrpQMFpkApXnNPUuf1XGuONKFa6ZdfETZhDkXQzM4DnPap6N0q0_qZoUm5HQiu19uBixZ1g

Mike from FLA
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Jonna
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Clyde from Shelby Township
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Valerie from San Juan Capistrano
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Nick
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Check out this episode!

Call Recovered About Mocktails and Other Non-alcoholic Drinks

150 150 Mark S
MONDAY night, the Recovery Topic is “Mocktails and other Non-alcoholic Drinks”
 
Summer is almost here, which means warmer weather, longer days and the season of BBQs, pool parties and dining al fresco. If you’re a recovering alcoholic, it can also mean the added stress of sweating out social events where frosty margaritas, colorful pitchers of sangria, tubs of ice-cold beer and other alcoholic beverages are center stage. “For an alcoholic, life is a temptation to drink,” says Kelly Fitzgerald, a blogger at The Sober Señorita and Addiction.com. “But the summer setting may bring on more of a temptation than winter, simply because there are more outdoor parties in the heat, begging for a cool drink.”
Let’s talk about this solution.  Tap Speakpipe (preferred because the sound quality is excellent.  Use this method especially if you are outside the Unites States) or call 1-734-288-7510 and answer the following question(s):
What do you drink for fun? What are your recipes? Most unusual? What do you avoid?
Recovered Podcast is live online every Tuesday at 6:30 pm EST as we record the show.  Join the fun and be part of the show.
If you would like to listen to the live stream of the show, just tap Recovered Chat and Live Stream.  We give away an Amazon gift card each week, you could win if you join us on Tuesdays.  
 
Click on our Show Notes we will use Monday night.

Jay, Bill, and Matt Part 2

150 150 Mark S

Our generous Recovered Podcast Community allows us to be self supporting and not rely on outside contributions.  If you would like to join us, there are two ways.

  1. Episode Sponsorship  We will recognize you by first name only at the top, mid, and end of the episode.  Any amount will qualify.
  2. Premium Membership  This is the single most effective way to support the show.  Watch the video in its entirety and learn how to become Premium

The Recovered Podcast Community is not a glum lot.  They contribute to the show and what they share is exactly what someone else needs to hear.  The new guy needs to hear your story.  So honor your 12th step obligation by calling in and help the guy who has not yet gone to his first meeting, you may make the difference in his life.  There are two ways to add to the show:

  1. Speakpipe Use your mobile or computer and leave a message.  This is the preferred method because the sound quality is excellent.
  2. 1-734-288-7510 is our voice message line.

Check out this episode!

Service Work – Recovered 830

150 150 Mark S

Our generous Recovered Podcast Community allows us to be self supporting and not rely on outside contributions.  If you would like to join us, there are two ways.

  1. Episode Sponsorship  We will recognize you by first name only at the top, mid, and end of the episode.  Any amount will qualify.
  2. Premium Membership  This is the single most effective way to support the show.  Watch the video in its entirety and learn how to become Premium

The Recovered Podcast Community is not a glum lot.  They contribute to the show and what they share is exactly what someone else needs to hear.  The new guy needs to hear your story.  So honor your 12th step obligation by calling in and help the guy who has not yet gone to his first meeting, you may make the difference in his life.  There are two ways to add to the show:

  1. Speakpipe Use your mobile or computer and leave a message.  This is the preferred method because the sound quality is excellent.
  2. 1-734-288-7510 is our voice message line.

One of the famous sayings used by Twelve Step groups is that,
you have to give it away in order to keep it.
What this is referring to is
the idea that service in recovery can help
the giver as much as the receiver.
This giving should not be done
in the hope of a reward or praise.
Instead the individual does it
because they know that it is helping to keep
them clean and sober too.
Numerous studies have provided evidence that
helping others in recovery provides
great benefit to the helper.

Service in recovery refers to
work carried out for no financial reward or compensation.
This may involve directly helping somebody else, or
indirectly helping them by providing services.

Let’s talk about our experience, strength, and hope as it relates to Service Work.

Let’s go to you first Dave

What does service work mean to you?
How has it helped your program?
What kinds of service have you done?

Has your sponsor ever volunteered you for something?
Have you ever suggested service for your sponsee?
Why do you think service work helps you feel better?
What is the most unique service you ever did?

What are you doing now?
Why do you think some people think of service work as a spiritual exercise?
How has your understanding of service work changed since you were new?

WE HAVE CALLS

Mike W from Celebration FLA
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Chris L.
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

Alex
https://www.speakpipe.com/messages

 

Check out this episode!